Woman being stopped by police in vehicle

What if You’re Accused of a Hit and Run Accident?

When you’ve been involved in a car accident in North Carolina, it’s important that you stay at the scene of the accident to see if everyone else involved is okay and if there is any property damage. It’s also likely that you must notify the police and file a report of the accident.

While most people take these steps, some people fail to stick around and do not call law enforcement to report the accident. When this occurs, the police will often look for the other driver involved, searching based on the make, model, color, and damage to the vehicle. 

When the police believe that your vehicle matches the description of the vehicle involved, you may be accused of a hit-and-run and face charges. Here’s what to know about what you may face if accused of a hit-and-run accident.  

Penalties

The penalties that you face are dependent upon how severe the accident was. Someone who doesn’t stay at the scene of the crash in which property damage occurred, may face misdemeanor charges of up to 120 days in jail and fines. But if someone injures another person and fails to stay at the scene of the crash and report it, they could face 4-25 months in jail, be ordered to pay fines, and lose their driver’s license. If serious bodily injury occurred, they could face 10-41 months in jail, pay large fines, and lose their license.  

In convicting you, the pros must show that did not meet your duty as a driver; that a reasonable person would have known that there was property damage or an injury and thus, would have stopped and stayed at the scene of the accident. The state is also responsible for proving that you were, in fact, involved in the accident. 

Evidence

There are various pieces of evidence that you can admit to disprove the state’s claims such as local surveillance video, dash cam footage, or old police reports of prior accidents that account for the damage to your vehicle. Additionally, if you have been wrongly accused, an alibi can help to defend against the charges you face. You have options.

The Attorneys at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Hit-and-Run

If you have been charged with a hit-and-run and believe that you are innocent or that your rights have been violated, you may have options. You have the right to defend yourself. Your best bet of doing so successfully is with the help of a knowledgeable and experienced North Carolina criminal defense attorney who understands what you are up against and will fight on your behalf. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight this charge. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

Man being put in handcuffs

Are You Being Detained or Arrested?

It’s easy for many people to confuse being detained with being arrested. However, the legal implications of these two interactions with police vary significantly. 

Detainment

In order for police officers to arrest you they require a certain threshold of evidence. So, what can an officer do if he or she believes that you committed an illegal activity but lack the aforementioned evidence? They can detain you. Police can hold you where you are without actually placing you in custody. They use the opportunity to speak with you and ask you questions in order to try and obtain more information. However, a gut feeling that you’ve been engaged in illegal activity isn’t enough; the police must have proof or at least a good reason to think so. Under detainment the police can hold you for up to 20 minutes. Detainment may result in arrest. However, the police may not even tell you that you are being arrested; If you are read your Miranda rights and aren’t free to leave you can make the assumption that you are.

Arrest

Being arrested is more serious than being detained. During an arrest the police will take you into custody. You will know that you are being arrested because you will not be able to leave. In order to arrest you the officer(s) need sufficient evidence of a crime (probable cause). If they lack such evidence then they must have a warrant for your arrest. When you are being arrested, the police are required to read you your Miranda rights. Miranda rights include the following:

  • You have the right to remain silent;
  • Anything you say can – and will – be used against you;
  • You have the right to an attorney; and
  • If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed to you.

When you are being arrested, the police may use reasonable, necessary force. They are also legally allowed to conduct a brief search of you and your possessions. Then you will be taken to a jail, detention facility, or police station. Once there you will be alerted of the charges against you and will have the chance to contact an attorney. 

Attorney Joel Hancock at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Crime

If you have been charged with a crime and believe that you are innocent or that your rights have been violated, you may have options. You have the right to defend yourself. Your best bet of doing so successfully is with the help of a knowledgeable and experienced North Carolina criminal defense attorney who understands what you are up against and will fight on your behalf. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight this charge. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

Man with handcuffs, being arrested for drug trafficking

Can Your Drug Addiction Result in a Drug Trafficking Charge in NC?

You risk a lot when you engage in drug use. But what many people don’t know is that having a drug addiction can potentially land you in prison for a high-level felony. Under North Carolina law, an individual commits drug trafficking offense when he or she knowingly manufactures, sells, delivers, transports, possesses or conspires to do any of the aforementioned in regards to a controlled substance. 

Quantity of Drugs in Possession

Whether someone is found guilty of drug trafficking is often dependent upon the quantity of drugs that they have in their possession. The court will look at the type of controlled substance that the individual has in their possession and whether it meets the weight necessary to rise to the level of trafficking. 

Levels of Drugs to Constitute Drug Trafficking

The minimum quantity of a controlled substance that reaches the level of trafficking differs among the type of controlled substance. Here are the minimum levels in one’s possession to be considered trafficking:

  • 4 grams of opium or heroin
  • 28 grams of amphetamine
  • 28 grams of cocaine
  • 28 grams of MDPV
  • 28 grams of Mephedrone
  • 28 grams of methamphetamine
  • 50 dosage units of synthetic cannabinoids
  • 10 pounds of marijuana
  • 100 units of LSD
  • 100 units or 499 grams of MDA/MDMA
  • 1,000 dosage units of methaqualone

Drug Traffickers Are Not Eligible for Drug Intervention Programs

So, while these amounts can certainly be due to trafficking the respective type of substance, they can also be the result of a severe drug addiction. Also concerning is that if you are charged with trafficking, you would not be eligible to participate in a drug intervention program that may have been available to you if you were charged with possession. While any drug-related charges are serious, those for trafficking are even more worrisome. Your freedom is at risk. 

That’s why it’s so important to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney who has experience defending against this type of charge. If you have been charged with drug trafficking that is actually an ongoing drug addiction, you need help more than anything else. 

Attorney Joel Hancock at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with Drug Trafficking

If you have been charged with drug trafficking as the result of a serious, ongoing drug addiction, you may have options. You have the right to defend yourself. Your best bet of doing so successfully is with the help of a knowledgeable and experienced North Carolina criminal defense attorney who understands what you are up against and will fight on your behalf. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight this charge. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

police at a scene

The Dos and Don’ts of Sobriety Checkpoints in North Carolina

While often extremely inconvenient, sobriety checkpoints are legal. But while you may not evade them, you still have certain rights. Here are the dos and don’ts of sobriety checkpoints in North Carolina.

DO Stop When Asked 

The Supreme Court has ruled that sobriety checkpoints are legal. Therefore, you must stop at a sobriety checkpoint if an officer asks you to do so. Cars are chosen to stop at random, so it doesn’t mean that you are being accused of anything. Just remember to stop, follow directions, and remain respectful. 

DO Provide Police with Your Information 

When a law enforcement officer asks you for your identification at a sobriety checkpoint it’s important that you listen and provide him or her with your driver’s license and vehicle registration. If you don’t do so, it could lead the officer to be suspicious of you and may end up with your arrest. 

DON’T Violate Any Traffic Laws 

If you see a sobriety checkpoint far ahead in the distance, you have the right to go in a different direction. However, it’s imperative that you do not make any illegal moves, such as an illegal U-turn as this could create reasonable suspicion for the police to believe you are under the influence, allowing them to then pull you over. 

DON’T Incriminate Yourself 

If you are asked to stop it’s likely that the police officer will ask you a few different questions including what you’ve had to drink, where you’re coming from, and where you’re going. While you may have only had “a couple of beers,” it’s important to understand that anything you say to an officer can later be used as evidence against you. It’s best to politely tell the officer that you decline to answer these questions. 

DON’T Take Field Sobriety Tests 

If you are stopped you may also be asked to take a field sobriety test, which often consists of walking in a straight line and standing on one foot. You should know that you are legally allowed to refuse taking this test. Politely decline to do so and express that you have the right to refuse. 

DON’T Voluntarily Take Blood or Breath Tests 

Sometimes the police will ask you to take a blood or breath test, which test for the level of alcohol in your system. Unless you are being arrested for DUI, you are not legally required to take a blood or breath test. It’s generally best to decline to take these tests when they are voluntary. 

Attorney Joel Hancock at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Helps Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with DUI/DWI

If you have been charged with DUI/DWI and believe that your rights have been violated, you may have options. You have the right to defend yourself. Your best bet of doing so successfully is with the help of a knowledgeable and experienced North Carolina criminal defense attorney who understands what you are up against and will fight on your behalf. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight this order. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

man handcuffed

5 Most Commonly Prosecuted Animal Cruelty Charges

Animals are so beloved that many people not only have them as pets but also consider them a member of the family. Sadly, not everyone shares in this kindness towards animals. Despite being illegal (and potentially including felony charges) in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, animal cruelty still occurs. Here are the 5 most commonly prosecuted animal cruelty charges according to the Animal Legal Defense Fund.

  1. Neglect

Housing an animal takes a lot of care. You must provide food, water, and a safe environment for the animal. Animal neglect occurs when someone fails to meet these basic needs. As with children, severe neglect can result in permanent injury or even death. Many times, we hear about animal neglect in cases of puppy mills in which hundreds of dogs are crammed into small spaces or cages and not given what they require to thrive. While mostly occurring with dogs, cats, and horses, neglect can occur with all types of animals. 

  1. Affirmative Acts of Abuse

Unlike animal neglect which is the failure to do/provide necessary things to allow the animal to thrive, affirmative acts of abuse include taking intentional actions for the purpose to injure or kill an animal. An individual does not need to own an animal to be guilty of an affirmative act of abuse. Sadly, these acts of abuse include everything from hitting the animal to setting it on fire. These instances are sometimes tied to domestic abuse situations in which the animals are used as part of the process to control the human victim. For instance, beating the family dog to scare and control a spouse into submission. 

  1. Animal Fighting

Animal fighting is one of the oldest (previously) accepted forms of animal abuse. It occurs when people force two animals to fight each other for their own human entertainment. Most of the time animal fighting includes gambling/betting on which animal will be victorious (i.e., kill the other one). It also often involves other crimes such as conspiracy, money laundering, and weapons offenses. While the most common form of animal fighting in the U.S. includes dogfighting and cockfighting, someone can be guilty of animal fighting with any animal. 

  1. Abandonment

Another devastating yet common form of animal cruelty is abandonment. Abandonment occurs when someone intentionally discards an animal it owns. This commonly occurs with people leaving their animal on the highway or even in the trash somewhere. Sadly, there has been a major increase in animal abandonment in light of the pandemic with many families leaving their animals behind when their home was foreclosed upon. 

  1. Bestiality

While very difficult to talk about, bestiality, or sexual crimes against animals, still occur today. They include individual owners assaulting their animals or even group events held in private at remote locations. Though tough to imagine, bestiality is not expressly illegal in all 50 states. However, it is expressly illegal in North Carolina.

Attorney Joel Hancock at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Helps Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with Animal Cruelty

If you have been charged with animal cruelty and believe that you are innocent or that your rights have been violated, you may have options. You have the right to defend yourself. Your best bet of doing so successfully is with the help of a knowledgeable and experienced North Carolina criminal defense attorney who understands what you are up against and will fight on your behalf. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight this charge. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

Man arrested for shooting into an occupied dwelling

Shooting into an Occupied Dwelling in North Carolina

Sadly, incidents of road rage have increased since the pandemic. With this, allegations of individuals shooting into occupied vehicles has also increased throughout North Carolina. There is a specific law against shooting into occupied dwellings, such as buildings, vehicles, and enclosures. The discharging of a firearm in North Carolina is a felony. 

In an alleged case of shooting into an occupied dwelling, the defendant is not responsible for providing evidence and does not carry a burden of proof. Rather, the state (prosecution carries the burden). The state must establish prima facie elements in order for the case to continue further.

Prima Facie Elements of Shooting into an Occupied Dwelling

These initial elements include the following:

  1. The defendant intentionally discharged his or her firearm (it doesn’t require an intent to injure or kill anyone);
  2. The discharge was willful and wanton;
  3. It went into a property, vehicle, or other conveyance; and
  4. Another person was occupying such property, vehicle, or conveyance at the time that the firearm was discharged. 

The Projectile Doesn’t Need to Enter the Dwelling or Injure Anyone

It’s important to note that sometimes it is enough to strike the exterior of a property depending upon the facts and circumstances of the case; It doesn’t always require a penetration of the dwelling. It may be enough to prove that the projectile struck the exterior of a building or something else attached to it. Additionally, the firing of the firearm doesn’t need to cause injury or death. For instance, if someone shot into the porch of a house someone was in, it could be enough for a conviction.

What Constitutes a Dwelling for Purposes of the Law?

There are a variety of places/things that may constitute a property for purposes of shooting into an occupied dwelling. Such “dwellings” include:

  • Residence
  • Motor vehicle
  • Structure
  • Equipment
  • Erected Enclosures
  • Device
  • Aircraft
  • Public Building
  • Private Building
  • Conveyance

Since every case is different, it’s important to look at the specific facts and circumstances in order to know how to defend yourself from such a charge. A qualified criminal defense attorney can help you to do just that.

Our Attorney at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with Shooting into an Occupied Dwelling

If you have been charged with shooting into an occupied dwelling it’s important that you take the charge seriously. You may have options. You have the right to defend yourself. Your best bet of doing so successfully is with the help of a knowledgeable and experienced North Carolina criminal defense attorney who understands what you are up against and will fight on your behalf. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight this order. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

Criminal defense attorney with Justice statue

What to Know About Larceny in North Carolina

Taking someone else’s property without their permission is generally punishable under the law. North Carolina takes these types of crimes seriously. The punishment for shoplifting, also known as larceny, is dependent upon the value of the goods that were stolen. 

Larceny Crimes Based on Value of Goods

If the value of the items that were stolen is less than $1,000, it is considered a Class 1 misdemeanor. However, if the stolen goods have a value of at least $1,000, it is considered a Class H felony and charges will be given accordingly. In order for an individual to be charged with either Class of larceny, he or she must have left the premises with possession of the stolen goods. 

While North Carolina separates larceny crimes based on the value of the goods, there are certain types of larceny that automatically constitute felony charges. Such types of larceny include:

  • Theft of an explosive device, firearm, or state archive;
  • Crimes involving breaking and entering; and
  • Theft in which the offender steals something from an individual’s person (an item directly from that person).

It is also illegal to hide items for the purpose of stealing them. However, concealment of merchandise is a separate crime and constitutes a misdemeanor. 

Penalties for Larceny

If someone is found guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor larceny, he or she will receive between one and 45 days in jail. The actual length is based upon other factors such as the individual’s criminal history as well as the facts and circumstances of the specific case. As for a felony larceny conviction, the penalty is anywhere from four to eight months in prison, also depending on the particular facts and circumstances of the case. 

Those convicted of concealing merchandise (without leaving the premises) will face penalties based upon whether this is a first offense.

For a first offense (Class 3 misdemeanor) they will receive 24 hours of community service. For a second offense (Class 2 misdemeanor) they will receive 72 hours of community service and 72 hours in jail and/or probation. For a third offense (Class 1 misdemeanor) they will receive at least 11 days in jail. 

It’s important to note that aside from these criminal penalties, those convicted of larceny charges will also be subject to civil penalties, such as being required to reimburse the store owner for the value of the goods and/or attorney fees. In some cases, they may also be subject to punitive damages. 

Joel Hancock at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Helps Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with Larceny 

If you have been charged with larceny or concealing merchandise, you have the right to defend yourself and prove your innocence. Your best bet of doing so successfully is with the help of a knowledgeable and experienced North Carolina criminal defense attorney who understands what you are up against and will fight on your behalf. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight this order. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

Man sitting with criminal defense attorney

Here’s Why You Should Always Follow a Protective Order

If a protective order for domestic assault has been filed against you, you may be extremely hurt, angry, confused, and wonder what to do next. You may think that the order is inappropriate or uncalled for, you may even think that the individual who filed it lied about what happened and that it is unnecessary. Here’s what to know about protective orders and why it’s imperative that you file one once it’s been filed – no matter how you feel about it.

Types of Protective Orders

There are two types of protective orders:

  1.  Ex parte; and 
  2. Permanent. 

Ex parte orders allow you the opportunity to present a defense to the order. But regardless of the type of order, never violate it. There are serious consequences if you do.

Ex Parte Order vs. Permanent Order

Under North Carolina law, an alleged victim has the ability to request that a protective order be put in place immediately. Should that immediate order be approved by a judge, it is considered ex parte, or temporary. It will be in effect until the date of a hearing at which the plaintiff, or alleged victim, and the defendant, the person subject to the order, can present their sides to the judge. If the judge sides with the defendant the order is dropped, but if the judge sides with the plaintiff, the order becomes permanent. However, it’s important to note that a permanent protective order is not, in fact, permanent. Generally, a permanent order stays in effect for up to one year. 

What Does a Protective Order Prevent or Require?

When a protective order is filed, a judge has the right to decide what the defendant is allowed to do, what he or she is precluded from doing, and what he or she must do. For instance, a judge can file an order that requires that:

  • The defendant has no contact (of any kind) with the plaintiff;
  • The defendant must move out of the residence they share with the plaintiff;
  • The plaintiff has temporary custody of any children; and/or
  • The defendant stays a certain distance from the plaintiff’s place of work, school, or home residence. 

As mentioned, the defendant is required to follow all parts of the protective order until it expires – unless it is renewed by a judge. 

What Are the Consequences of Violating a Protective Order?

It’s important to note that a protective order will not appear on the defendant’s criminal record. However, if the defendant violates the order in any way, it may result in a criminal arrest. Under North Carolina law, a first violation of a protective order is a misdemeanor, with any subsequent violation considered a felony. This can result in a steep fine or even jail time. 

Joel Hancock at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Hit with a Protective Order

If you have been hit with a protective order that you don’t believe you deserve, you may have options. If an ex parte order of protection has been filed against you, you have the right to defend yourself and prove your innocence. Your best bet of doing so successfully is with the help of a knowledgeable and experienced North Carolina criminal defense attorney who understands what you are up against and will fight on your behalf. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight this order. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

Criminal defense attorneys sitting at a table

What is the Safety Valve Provision and How Can it Lessen Federal Sentencing?

When someone is convicted of a specific crime or accepts a plea bargain, they automatically receive at least a pre-established minimum sentence for that crime. It may come as a surprise that it’s actually Congress – not a judge – that sets those minimums. The judge can choose to increase the sentence from the minimum required, but cannot lessen the sentence – except for the Safety Valve Provision if it’s applicable. 

What Is the Safety Valve Provision?

In 1984 Congress passed the Safety Valve Provision as part of the Sentencing Reform Act. The purpose of the Safety Valve Provision was to ensure that individuals convicted of non-violent, low-level offenses who didn’t have a criminal history did not receive unreasonably disproportionate sentences. It generally applies to drug crimes with a mandatory minimum.

Each federal crime carries its own offense level, which falls between one and 43; the higher the number, the more serious the crime or aggravating factors. The Safety Valve Provision provides a two-point reduction in the offense level. Alternatively, if a suspect is found to obstruct justice during the investigation, the offense level is then increased by two points. If that same person is shown to be remorseful for their wrongdoing, their offense level may be decreased by two points. While two points may not seem like much, those two points can help to drastically reduce the length of one’s sentence. 

Who is Eligible for the Safety Valve Provision?

The Safety Valve Provision does not apply to everyone; the individual must be eligible for it. To be eligible, the individual must meet the following requirements:

  • Limited Criminal History

If the offender has a criminal history, the sentencing guidelines will assign specific appoints to those prior convictions. They must not have more than four points for their criminal history (not including any one-point offenses).

  • No Violence, Credible Threat, or Dangerous Weapon

The crime that the individual committed must have been a non-violent crime and they must not have made any credible threats of violence. Additionally, they must not have possessed a firearm or dangerous weapon at the time that the crime was committed. The Court will also examine whether the offender convinced anyone else to commit violence or possess a firearm during the crime.

  •  No Death or Serious Injury

The offense committed must not have resulted in any deaths or serious bodily injuries. 

  • Not the Leader or Organizer 

The offender must not have led, organized, or managed a group committing the crime. 

  • Cooperation with Investigators

The offender must have cooperated with investigators and provided them with comprehensive information and evidence pertinent to their conduct in the case. 

Which Criminal Cases Eligible for the Safety Valve Provision?

Not every crime is eligible for the Safety Valve Provision either. In fact, only those crimes that the statute lists are eligible. These charges include:

  • Distribution, manufacturing, or dispensing of a controlled or counterfeit substance;

 

  • Simple possession of a controlled substance; 

 

  • Attempt and conspiracy to distribute, manufacture, or dispense a controlled or counterfeit substance; and 

 

  • Importing or exporting a controlled substance or bringing it on board a vessel, aircraft, or vehicle. 

Attorney Joel Hancock at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Crime

If you have been charged with a crime, you may have options. You have the right to defend yourself and prove your innocence. Your best bet of doing so successfully is with the help of a knowledgeable and experienced North Carolina criminal defense attorney who understands what you are up against and will fight on your behalf. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight this order. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

Criminal defense attorneys discussing a case

What to Know About Embezzlement in North Carolina

Embezzlement, often referred to as a white-collar crime, is the taking of money, funds, or other property that is received because of the individual’s job or their office, and he or she knowingly converts such assets for his or her own use. Put simply, when someone is trusted to manage money or other property and they steal it, it is considered embezzlement. 

Multiple Incidents

It’s important to understand that often embezzlement involves more than just one incident; rather it occurs over a period of time. In an effort to hide what is going on, the individual stealing the money or property does so with small funds at a time, ultimately resulting in a large sum of money or property. 

Examples of common embezzlement include:

  • Writing false checks from a business to oneself and cashing them;
  • Overcharging customers and taking the excess fees;
  • Using company property or resources for personal gain;
  • Creating false employees and issuing paychecks to oneself;
  • Stealing company property; or
  • Stealing money from a cash register. 

Embezzlement vs. Larceny

You may be thinking that embezzlement sounds a lot like the crime of larceny. However, there is one major difference. While both crimes involve the theft of money or assets, an individual who is embezzling has been previously trusted with such money or property. 

In order to prove embezzlement, the following elements must be met:

  1. The accused was in a fiduciary relationship with the victim;
  2. The accused obtained the money or property through his fiduciary relationship;
  3. The accused’s actions were intentional; and
  4. The accused took ownership of the property or gave it to someone else.

A fiduciary relationship may include a relationship with a:

  • Accountant
  • Financial advisor
  • Insurance adjuster
  • Corporate officer 
  • Employee
  • Officer of a charitable organization
  • Public or governmental official
  • Family member if entrusted to care for someone or handle their estate

The Consequences of Embezzlement

The penalties for an embezzlement conviction depend upon the perpetrator’s relationship to the victim and the amount of money or property taken.

  • Public employees and government officials – If more than $100,000 was embezzled, it is considered a Class C felony with a sentence of 58 to 73 months in prison; if less, then a Class F felony with a sentence of 13 to 16 months in prison. 

 

  • Treasurers of charitable organizations – If more than $100,000 was embezzled, it is considered a Class C felony with a sentence of 58 to 73 months in prison; if less, than a Class H felony with five to six months in jail.

 

  • Employees, officers, clerks, and agents of a corporation – If more than $100,000 was embezzled, it is considered a Class C felony with a sentence of 58 to 73 months in prison; if less, than a Class H felony with five to six months in jail.

Restitution

Aside from a prison or jail sentence, you may also be required to pay restitution to the victim. Restitution is essentially restoring the victim of what you stole. This can be paid in installments or a lump sum. Furthermore, you may stay on probation until you have completed your payment. 

The Attorneys at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Crime

It can be incredibly scary to be arrested, and even more frightening to learn that you are going to be prosecuted under the criminal justice system. Not only the outcome of the case, but the experience itself can have a major impact on your life. That is why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!