Man being put in handcuffs

A Lawyer Can Help Defend You Against Child Abuse Allegations in NC

Any allegations of child abuse should be taken extremely seriously. If you have been suspected of child abuse it can impact your life – whether or not you are charged, let alone convicted. This is because allegations of child abuse can negatively interfere with your ability to gain custody of your child in a divorce case, can ruin your reputation and that of your business, and can be exceedingly stressful, affecting your well-being. 

Avoid Speaking About Your Child Abuse Case

If you have been accused of child abuse, you should never speak about it with anyone – not even child protective services – without speaking with your attorney. A knowledgeable and experienced North Carolina family law attorney can collect and review evidence, conduct a separate investigation, and help you achieve the best possible outcome for you and your children via a strong defense. 

Fighting Charges of Child Abuse

Unfortunately, sometimes contentious divorces involve false allegations  — especially when minor children are involved. Not everyone who is accused of child abuse has laid a hand on his or her child. 

A qualified family law attorney can help work towards achieving a pre-trial dismissal or reduction of your charges. In some cases, he or she can even help you to obtain a plea agreement that would reduce the potential consequences of a conviction for child abuse. 

What Happens if Your Case Goes to Trial?

Should your case go to trial, a qualified litigator will be important for helping you to prepare. Since the prosecution will likely bring in medical experts to prove that you were abusive, it’s important that you understand the nature of the injuries that you are being accused of and possibly present your own medical expert for your defense. 

By working with the right attorney, you will be able to focus on the important issues and combat even the most difficult cases. 

Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Helps Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Crime

A criminal conviction in North Carolina can have a very long-lasting impact on your life. Not only can it affect your ability to obtain or keep certain jobs, but also it can have a permanent impact on your reputation. Child abuse is a very serious crime that should be taken very seriously. That’s why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced North Carolina criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome for you. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

Man arrested for trespassing

What to Know About Criminal Trespassing in North Carolina

There are few bigger purchases that you will make in life than your home. To own your own property can provide a sense of peace and comfort. But when illegal trespassing is involved, it can turn your safe haven into an uncomfortable place to be. 

North Carolina defines trespassing as intending to enter or stay on a piece of property without permission. It’s important to note that intent is a big part of the law.  That’s why if you’ve been accused of criminal trespassing in North Carolina, a qualified criminal defense attorney can help to prove that you had no intent to be on another’s property. This can be supported through evidence.

Under state law, there are two different types of trespassing, with two different definitions and two different sets of penalties. These types include first- and second-degree trespassing. 

Degrees of Criminal Trespassing in North Carolina

First-degree trespassing is defined as entering and/or staying on a property without permission. This property includes another’s secured or enclosed property that is clearly intended to keep people out (e.g. a fenced-in yard). 

Second-degree trespassing usually follows a first-degree offense. In other words, this type of trespassing is an elevated form of the first. For instance, this may include a situation in which someone goes breaks into a locked building that also displays a “No Trespassing” sign. The type of trespassing an incident is classified as depends upon the facts and circumstances of that specific case. 

 Criminal Trespassing Charges in North Carolina

When someone is charged with first-degree trespassing, it is generally considered a Class 2 misdemeanor, although there are certain aggravating factors that when present may increase the charge. For example, if someone trespasses on a public utility provider’s property with the intent to interrupt operations there. This could be increased to a Class H felony. Should an intruder trespass on the property again after previously being removed from it, the charge could become a Class I felony.

As for second-degree trespassing, it is generally considered a Class 3 misdemeanor. However, depending upon the factors of the case (similar to those with first-degree trespassing), these charges can vary.  

Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Helps Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Crime

A criminal conviction in North Carolina can have a very long-lasting impact on your life. Not only can it affect your ability to obtain or keep certain jobs, but also it can have a permanent impact on your reputation. That’s why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced North Carolina criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome for you. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

Police lights

Levels of DWI in North Carolina

Driving is inherently dangerous, so driving while impaired (DWI) is even riskier – and illegal. In North Carolina, there are six different levels of misdemeanor convictions if you are found to be DWI: levels 1A, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. The first three levels (1A, 1, and 2) are the most serious, while the remaining three are less serious. The level that you are charged with is dependent upon the specific facts of your case. 

Aggravating Factors

The first thing that a court will look at is whether there is at least one grossly aggravating factor. This could include any one of the following:

  1. Prior conviction for DWI within seven years of the date of the present DWI. 
  2. The driver was driving on a license that was revoked for another alcohol-related offense
  3. The driver charged caused a serious injury to another person at the time of the offense
  4. The defendant committed the DWI while one of the following individuals was in his vehicle:
    1. A child under the age of 18
    2. A person with the mental development of a child under the age of 18
    3. A person with a physical disability preventing them from exiting the vehicle without assistance

In determining the level of a DWI, the following holds true:

  • One grossly aggravating factor equates to a level 2.
  • Two factor is a level 1.
  • Three or more factors constitute the most serious level: 1A.
  • Without any grossly aggravating factors, the level is 3, 4, or 5. This is determined by balancing the aggravating factors against any mitigating factors.
    • If aggravating factors outweigh mitigating factors, the DWI is a level 3.
    • If the aggravating and mitigating factors counterbalance themselves, this is a level 4.
    • If the mitigating factors outweigh the aggravating factors, the DWI is a level 5.

Mitigating factors include:

  • Slight impairment of the defendant’s faculties resulting solely from alcohol, and an alcohol concentration that did not exceed 0.09.

 

  • Slight impairment of the defendant’s faculties, resulting solely from alcohol, with no chemical analysis having been available to the defendant.

 

  • Driving at the time of the offense was safe and lawful except for the impairment of the defendant’s faculties.

 

  • A safe driving record, with the defendant’s having no conviction for any motor vehicle offense for which at least four points are assigned or for which the person’s license is subject to revocation within five years of the date of the offense for which the defendant is being sentenced.

 

  • Impairment of the defendant’s faculties caused primarily by a lawfully prescribed drug for an existing medical condition, and the amount of the drug taken was within the prescribed dosage.

 

  • The defendant’s voluntary submission to a mental health facility for assessment after being charged with the impaired driving offense for which the defendant is being sentenced, and, if recommended by the facility, voluntary participation in the recommended treatment. (6a) Completion of a substance abuse assessment, compliance with its recommendations, and simultaneously maintaining 60 days of continuous abstinence from alcohol consumption, as proven by a continuous alcohol monitoring system. The continuous alcohol monitoring system shall be of a type approved by the Division of Adult Correction and Juvenile Justice of the Department of Public Safety.

 

  • Any other factor that mitigates the seriousness of the offense.

The Attorneys at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a DWI

A conviction for DWI can have a significant impact on your life. That’s why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome for you. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

prescription drugs

Defending Yourself Against Prescription Drug Fraud Charges in NC

Modern medicine has made such an impact on the way that we live our lives. It helps millions of people each day to feel better. Unfortunately, though, many people use medications for the wrong reasons and commit prescription fraud in an attempt to gain access to more pills. 

Common Drugs Obtained Through Prescription Fraud

Common drugs often obtained through prescription fraud include:

  • Benzodiazepines
  • Stimulants
  • Pain relievers

Opioids are a type of pain reliever that is highly addictive. In recent years opioid addiction has become an epidemic of massive proportions. Since those who take opiates eventually adjust to them, they require a higher and higher dosage to get the same effect. 

Common Types of Prescription Fraud

Prescription fraud is not only committed by patients, but by medical professionals as well. There are a number of ways in which someone can commit prescription fraud. Such ways include:

  • Forging a prescription
  • Calling in a prescription while pretending to be a doctor
  • Doctor shopping (visiting multiple doctors to obtain more prescriptions)
  • Filing a false report that claiming medication theft so that you can obtain more medication
  • Prescribing medication without any real reason
  • Purchasing, obtaining, and/or sharing prescription medication with others

Penalties for Prescription Fraud in North Carolina

When someone is found guilty of committing prescription fraud in Texas, they must face the consequences. If the drug is considered Scheduled I, prescription fraud can be charged as a Class I felony. As such you can face three to 12 months in prison. 

When the controlled substance involved is considered a Schedule II, III, or IV drug, you can be charged with a Class 1 misdemeanor, though in rare situations can be charged as a Class I felony. If you are convicted, you can face the same between one and 120 days in jail. 

When the controlled substance involved is considered a Schedule V drug, you can be charged with a Class 2 misdemeanor. If you are convicted, you can face up to 60 days in jail and a fine of up to $1,000.

When the controlled substance involved is considered a Schedule VI drug, it can be charged as a Class 3 misdemeanor. If you are convicted, you could face up to 30 days in jail and a $200 fine.

The Attorneys at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Crime

A criminal conviction in North Carolina can have a very long-lasting impact on your life. Not only can it affect your ability to obtain or keep certain jobs, but also it can have a permanent impact on your reputation. Additionally, the insanity defense in North Carolina can be quite complex. That’s why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome for you. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

police car stopping car

What Are My Rights if I’m Stopped by Police in North Carolina?

When the police stop you it can be extremely intimidating – even if you’ve done nothing illegal. That’s why it’s so important to understand all of your rights when in such a position. 

There are several reasons as to why a police officer may choose to stop you. Aside from conducting a routine stop, police officers are given much deference when it comes to suspecting that someone has violated a law. When someone has reasonable suspicion, they may choose to conduct a search of you and/or your vehicle (if they have separate probable cause). However, there are also limitations to what the police can search. 

When you are being pulled over while driving, it’s key that you stay calm and try to pull to the right shoulder or over somewhere as soon as possible without putting yourself or anyone else in any type of unnecessary danger.

The First Amendment

The First Amendment grants you the freedom of speech. Therefore you are free to calmly object to a search of yourself or your vehicle. Additionally, the same amendment allows you to record your experience with the police. You are allowed to take pictures and videos of officers while they are performing their official duties in a public setting. Because police officers require a warrant to go through your cell phone, you have the right to keep your pictures and records – you do not have to delete them if requested or demanded. You must still make sure that you do not interfere with anything that the police are doing while you are exercising the aforementioned rights.

The Fourth Amendment

Under the Fourth Amendment, you can object to an unreasonable search and seizure of your property. This means that if you believe that the police officer did not have probable cause (a legitimate reason) to search your property, you can object. If a police officer believes that you are carrying a weapon he or she may pat you down on (top of) your clothing. You may feel violated or helpless during this situation, but if you believe that a police officer is conducting any type of search or seizure illegally, it’s imperative that you express your lack of consent during the search. This statement can actually serve you during future legal proceedings. 

The Fifth Amendment

Finally, under the Fifth Amendment, you are granted your Miranda rights. Miranda rights, which are required whenever police are holding a suspect, explain that you have the right to remain silent, as anything that you say can (and will) be used against you in a court of law. You also have the right to an attorney or an attorney will be appointed to you if you can’t afford one. Additionally, you don’t have to answer anything that the police officer asks. In such a situation you should explain that you are invoking your Fifth Amendment right and request an attorney.

Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Helps Those in North Carolina Whose Rights Have Been Violated by the Police

If you or a loved one has had your rights violated by a police officer it is imperative that you contact a North Carolina criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. A violation of your rights can overturn an entire case. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you fight your charges and obtain the best possible outcome for you. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

north carolina revenge porn

Does North Carolina Have a Law Against Revenge Porn?

There’s no doubt that breaking up is hard to do. Unfortunately, many people take the pain of a breakup and manifest it in harmful ways. They sometimes take petty and hurtful actions in order to hurt the other person. But while most of these actions aren’t illegal, there are some that cross the line.

With the increased prevalence of cell phones, many couples are taking more intimate photos and videos of themselves and one another. But when one person shares these images or videos without the permission of the other person(s) in them, this is illegal and is commonly known as “revenge porn.”

North Carolina Revenge Porn Laws

In 2017 North Carolina passed a new law that would allow the prosecution of an individual who took the photos or videos without the other person featured knowing. Previously, the law prohibited prosecution if the featured person didn’t know the images were taken. The 2017 law made prosecution possible in situations in which the featured person was unaware that their picture had been taken or they had been filmed.

The reason behind the change is that it was agreed that the act of taking someone’s picture or video in such a state without permission in and of itself seemed like a violation of privacy rights, so therefore sharing those same images without permission also seemed like a violation.

In order for someone to be convicted of revenge porn, they must:

  1. Share an intimate image of another person without their permission;
  2. The person who shared the image had mal-intent;
  3. There exists or existed a personal relationship between the parties; and
  4. There was a reasonable expectation of privacy.

1. Intimate Images

An image is considered “intimate” if it includes any of the following body parts:

  • Male or female genitalia
  • The female or male pubic area
  • The anus of either gender
  • The nipple, if a female is over age 12

These images are especially intimate when they include an identifying feature of the person pictured. 

2. Mal-Intent

There’s no doubt that it can be extremely embarrassing for any type of intimate picture to reach someone else’s eyes without your approval. However, in order to succeed on a revenge porn case the prosecution must be able to show that the individual who shared the image did so in order to do one of the following to the victim:

  • Harass
  • Intimidate
  • Demean
  • Humiliate
  • Coerce
  • Result in financial loss

It may also be enough to satisfy this factor if the person who shared the image with others knew that the others would act in one of the above manners.

3. Personal Relationship

What is considered a personal relationship under North Carolina law?

  • Current or former spouses
  • Persons of the opposite sex who currently live or have lived together
  • Parents and children, including designated guardians 
  • Those who have a child in common
  • Current or former household members
  • Persons of the opposite sex who are in a dating relationship or have been in a dating relationship

4. Reasonable Expectation of Privacy 

In order to meet a reasonable expectation of privacy, it’s not enough for the defendant to state that the victim never explicitly told them to keep the image to themselves. An expectation of privacy need only be reasonable. A reasonable expectation of privacy is more easily proven in a personal relationship since trust is generally involved. 

What Are the Consequences?

Under North Carolina law, revenge porn is a Class H felony. However, for minors, their first-time offense can be tried as a Class 1 misdemeanor. Any subsequent offenses of the same nature would also result in being tried as a Class H felony. 

Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Helps Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Crime

A criminal conviction for revenge porn in North Carolina can have a very long-lasting impact on your life. Not only can it affect your freedom, your rights, and your ability to obtain or keep certain jobs, but also it can have a permanent impact on your reputation. That’s why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome for you. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

police at the scene of a crime

Can You Be Convicted of Murder Without the Intent to Kill?

When someone accidentally crashes their car into the vehicle in front of them, they can still be held responsible – even though it was unintentional. But what about a felony? Can someone be held responsible for a felony that they didn’t mean to commit? Surprisingly, the answer is yes.

The Felony Murder Rule

When someone commits a dangerous felony and accidentally kills someone else in the commission of the crime, he or she can still be charged with first-degree murder. This is known as felony murder. If someone is an accomplice to a dangerous felony that results in an unintentional killing, he or she can also be charged with murder. 

For instance, imagine someone brings a gun to rob a bank and confronts the bank teller with the weapon. The bank teller is terrified and suffers a heart attack and dies as a result. The individual with the gun and the getaway driver can both be charged with first-degree murder under the felony murder rule. 

Felonies

Under North Carolina’s felony murder rule, someone can be found guilty of first-degree murder if a homicide is committed during the commission or the attempted commission of any of the following felonies:

  • Robbery;
  • Burglary;
  • Kidnapping;
  • Rape or a felony sex offense;
  • Arson;
  • Any felony committed or attempted with the use of a deadly weapon.

Possession of a Deadly Weapon

As for the last bullet, the defendant isn’t required to know ahead of time that he or she will use a deadly weapon. Likewise, any accomplices to the crime don’t have to know that the other possessed a deadly weapon. It doesn’t matter whether co-conspirators are aware that the other defendant had a gun so long as the gun was used in the commission or attempted commission of a felony that he or she did know about and take part in, in some manner. 

Additionally, it is irrelevant whether or not the deadly weapon was even used to commit the primary felony – just that it was in the defendant’s possession. 

Whereas first-degree murder ordinarily requires proof of intent, this is not required under the felony murder rule. Rather, the defendant must have had intent to commit the initial felony. 

And finally, it doesn’t matter at what part of the attempt or commission of a crime someone is killed. It only matters that they were killed during the uninterrupted chain of events. For instance, if the bank robber jumps into a getaway car and while speeding away crashes into another car, which causes it to hit a pedestrian, the robber and driver could be charged with first-degree murder under the felony murder rule. 

Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with Felony Murder

A charge under the felony murder rule should be taken very seriously, as a conviction can have long-term effects on your life. That’s why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome for you. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

beer cans

What to Know About Fake IDs and Underage Drinking in North Carolina

The law is clear surrounding the purchase of alcohol and those who fail to adhere to it will be punished. This is the job of Alcohol Law Enforcement (ALE) agents. They are responsible for investigating, citing, and at times arresting individuals who commit criminal offenses concerning the sale of alcohol and other offenses related to public health and safety. This includes the sale of alcohol to minors (those under the legal age for consumption of alcoholic beverages). Oftentimes ALE agents will partner with local law enforcement officers. 

Criminal Citations Fake IDs, Underage Drinking and Sales

ALE agents may also investigate potential fake IDs. When a fake ID is suspected, ALE agents or police officers may investigate. Unfortunately, fake IDs are common among high school and college students, who purchase them online or are given them by a friend. When a fake ID is confirmed, the individual who tried to use it will receive a criminal citation for possession of the fake ID, possession of alcohol while underage, or furnishing alcohol to minors.

A Qualified North Carolina Criminal Defense Attorney Can Help

Those who receive such a citation may feel overwhelmed and not know what to do. That’s where a knowledgeable and qualified North Carolina criminal defense attorney can make a difference. The right lawyer will help to negotiate with the District Attorney on your case and try to have the citation dismissed and expunged from public records. 

It’s important to understand that even if a case is dismissed it will still appear on background checks resulting in questions surrounding your record when you go to do something such as apply for a job. However, once it’s expunged it will be erased. Once a citation is dismissed, a lawyer can work on having it expunged from your criminal record.

Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Helps Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Crime

A criminal conviction in North Carolina can have a very long-lasting impact on your life. Not only can it affect your ability to obtain or keep certain jobs, but also it can have a permanent impact on your reputation. 

Fake IDs and underage drinking is a reality for many students, but such a mistake should not have to impact your future. That’s why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible.

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome for you and your future. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

Posted in DWI
drinking and driving

3 Tips to Avoid Driving While Intoxicated

Drunk driving is one of the biggest errors in judgment that someone can make. While people generally never plan to drive while under the influence of alcohol, poor planning often results in a false belief that the person will be able to get themselves home after drinking. Many people in this situation fail to consider that there are a lot of other ways that they can get home safely without getting behind the wheel of a car. For many people who drive drunk, the choice to do so would never be made when they were sober. 

Luckily, there are things that can be done while sober to help avoid making a potentially life-altering and dangerous decision. Here are 3 tips to avoid driving while intoxicated.

1. Stay over someone else’s place. 

Rather than worry about how you are going to get home after drinking, you can plan on not having to go home at all. Whether you make plans to stay at the house where you were drinking, go home with someone else who has not been drinking, or stay at a hotel within walking distance of the bar, you won’t have to even think twice about driving. 

2. Give a friend your keys.

If you don’t know how much you plan on drinking but are concerned that it could be too much to drive, it’s always good to get the opinion of someone whom you trust. You can give your keys to a friend, party host, or bartender, so that when you decide it’s time to go home, they can decide whether you need an alternate way of getting there safely. 

3. Have a designated driver

Lastly, one of the most common options for avoiding getting behind the wheel while drunk is to have a designated driver. A designated driver is someone whom you will agree upon ahead of time, who will not be drinking, and can therefore be responsible for driving you home safely. This could be someone who can’t drink for medical reasons or who doesn’t care to drink – or this could simply be someone different in your group each time, who takes turns not drinking each time you go out. 

You should always plan ahead whenever alcohol may be involved. However, if you fail to do so and have made the unfortunate decision to drive while intoxicated and are now charged with a DUI, it’s important that you seek a knowledgeable and experienced North Carolina criminal defense attorney who can help. 

Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Helps Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Crime

A criminal conviction in North Carolina can have a very long-lasting impact on your life. Not only can it affect your ability to obtain or keep certain jobs, but also it can have a permanent impact on your reputation. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to obtain the best possible outcome for you. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

Posted in DWI
man taking bribe money under the table

What Is the Difference Between Extortion and Bribery in NC?

You may be under the impression that bribery and extortion are the same things, but they are not. While many people use these terms interchangeably and they are both considered to be “white-collar” crimes often involving money, the elements of each are different. 

Extortion

Extortion is a crime that involves demanding payment or compensation of another kind in exchange for either doing something or abstaining from doing something. Under North Carolina law:

Any person who threatens or communicates a threat or threatens another with the intent to wrongfully obtain something of value or an advantage, immunity, or acquittal, has performed extortion. Wrongful intent is viewed in relation to acquiring the property and not the threat itself. Threats are inherently wrong in nature. 

In other words, extortion occurs when someone communicates a threat or directly threatens someone else with the wrongful intent to acquire one of the following:

  • Something of value
  • The settlement of a fine or a debt
  • Immunity
  • Any other type of advantage

Extortion is a Class F felony, which can carry 10 to 41 months in prison. Prior convictions play a role as to the exact amount of time someone will be sentenced to. It’s important to note that blackmail, while commonly combined with extortion, is not the same charge. North Carolina treats blackmail as a Class 1 misdemeanor. 

Examples of extortion include:

  • Someone threatens to do harm to an auto dealership unless the owner of the dealership agrees to waive the extra fees on a car.
  • A defendant threatens to publish private, embarrassing information about a judge unless he or she drops the charges. 
  • Someone threatens to share nude photos of someone else unless they pay a certain amount of money.

Although celebrities and individuals in power are often the targets of extortion plots, anyone can attempt to extort anyone else – regardless of who they are – so long as the elements of the crime are met. 

Bribery

Bribery is different from extortion in that it usually involves government officials or employees. It too involves the exchange of money or something else of value (e.g. favorable treatment). However, bribery can also involve corporate entities or private citizens. Bribery tends to have no paper trail, which requires a lot of work from the prosecutor to prove that it even occurred, to begin with. It’s important to note that it’s not only government officials or employees who can be bribed. Government officials or employees can be the ones committing bribery. Whether or not the bribe was accepted is irrelevant to the commission of the crime itself. 

Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with Extortion of Bribery

A conviction for extortion or bribery can have a significant impact on your life. That’s why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome for you. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!