Criminal defense attorneys discussing a case

What to Know About Embezzlement in North Carolina

Embezzlement, often referred to as a white-collar crime, is the taking of money, funds, or other property that is received because of the individual’s job or their office, and he or she knowingly converts such assets for his or her own use. Put simply, when someone is trusted to manage money or other property and they steal it, it is considered embezzlement. 

Multiple Incidents

It’s important to understand that often embezzlement involves more than just one incident; rather it occurs over a period of time. In an effort to hide what is going on, the individual stealing the money or property does so with small funds at a time, ultimately resulting in a large sum of money or property. 

Examples of common embezzlement include:

  • Writing false checks from a business to oneself and cashing them;
  • Overcharging customers and taking the excess fees;
  • Using company property or resources for personal gain;
  • Creating false employees and issuing paychecks to oneself;
  • Stealing company property; or
  • Stealing money from a cash register. 

Embezzlement vs. Larceny

You may be thinking that embezzlement sounds a lot like the crime of larceny. However, there is one major difference. While both crimes involve the theft of money or assets, an individual who is embezzling has been previously trusted with such money or property. 

In order to prove embezzlement, the following elements must be met:

  1. The accused was in a fiduciary relationship with the victim;
  2. The accused obtained the money or property through his fiduciary relationship;
  3. The accused’s actions were intentional; and
  4. The accused took ownership of the property or gave it to someone else.

A fiduciary relationship may include a relationship with a:

  • Accountant
  • Financial advisor
  • Insurance adjuster
  • Corporate officer 
  • Employee
  • Officer of a charitable organization
  • Public or governmental official
  • Family member if entrusted to care for someone or handle their estate

The Consequences of Embezzlement

The penalties for an embezzlement conviction depend upon the perpetrator’s relationship to the victim and the amount of money or property taken.

  • Public employees and government officials – If more than $100,000 was embezzled, it is considered a Class C felony with a sentence of 58 to 73 months in prison; if less, then a Class F felony with a sentence of 13 to 16 months in prison. 

 

  • Treasurers of charitable organizations – If more than $100,000 was embezzled, it is considered a Class C felony with a sentence of 58 to 73 months in prison; if less, than a Class H felony with five to six months in jail.

 

  • Employees, officers, clerks, and agents of a corporation – If more than $100,000 was embezzled, it is considered a Class C felony with a sentence of 58 to 73 months in prison; if less, than a Class H felony with five to six months in jail.

Restitution

Aside from a prison or jail sentence, you may also be required to pay restitution to the victim. Restitution is essentially restoring the victim of what you stole. This can be paid in installments or a lump sum. Furthermore, you may stay on probation until you have completed your payment. 

The Attorneys at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Crime

It can be incredibly scary to be arrested, and even more frightening to learn that you are going to be prosecuted under the criminal justice system. Not only the outcome of the case, but the experience itself can have a major impact on your life. That is why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

Criminal defense attorney speaking with a client

When Can Criminal Charges Be Dropped in North Carolina?

When you’ve been charged with a crime it can be an extremely overwhelming time. You want to prove that you are not guilty, but you’ve probably spent a lot of time wishing the situation would go away entirely. And sometimes, it does. The best outcome – regardless of the seriousness of the accusations against you – would be for the charges to be dropped before you ever go to trial. The good news is that this can occur. 

The Prosecutor Holds the Power 

The only person who has the power to voluntarily dismiss your criminal charge is the prosecutor. When you are charged with a crime, you are actually being prosecuted by the state of North Carolina. The prosecutor will take a number of factors into consideration when making their decision. Here are reasons why your charges may be dropped or dismissed in North Carolina:

  • The prosecutor knows that based on the facts the elements required to prove the crime cannot be proven to standard necessary: beyond a reasonable doubt;
  • The witnesses who would help to prove the case are either unavailable or refuse to appear in court;
  • The police infringed upon your constitutional rights when they conducted their investigation (e.g. unreasonable search and seizure of your property, lack of Miranda warning while interrogated under custody, etc.); 
  • Your attorney negotiated on your behalf for a dismissal of your case in exchange for treatment, assessment, or community service. It’s important to note that generally this does not involve the judge. 

Refrain from Contacting Witnesses or Alleged Victims During Your Case

Remember that you should never contact the state’s witnesses or any alleged victims to discuss your case. This is because you want to avoid the appearance of being coercive or threatening. Rather, it’s in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney in North Carolina who has experience negotiating with the District Attorney and Assistant District Attorneys. He or she will work in your best interest to have your charges dismissed or reduced. 

The Attorneys at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Whose Child Has Been Charged with a Crime

It can be incredibly scary to learn that you are accused of a crime and are going to be prosecuted under the criminal justice system. Not only the outcome of the case, but the experience itself can have a major impact on you. That is why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

broken car window

Types of Auto Theft in North Carolina

Unfortunately, the theft of motor vehicles in North Carolina is not uncommon. It’s important to understand that there are different types of theft as well as other crimes that may apply when an individual uses, damages, or misappropriates an auto vehicle. 

North Carolina varies from some other states in that it does not have a specific motor vehicle theft law. These auto theft crimes are prosecuted under North Carolina’s crime of larceny, or theft. When a person takes another’s motor vehicle with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of it or when someone receives or possesses a stolen car, this is considered to be the crime of larceny. 

When someone steals a part or piece of a vehicle that is valued at $1,000 or more, this is considered to be the crime of larceny of a motor vehicle part. This value includes not only the part itself but the cost of labor to have it reinstalled or reattached to the vehicle. Larceny of a motor vehicle part is a Class I felony.

Additional Car-Related Offenses

Aside from motor vehicle theft, North Carolina recognizes and punishes other car-related offenses. 

Carjacking

Carjacking is when someone takes a car by force or threat of force. While North Carolina does not have a specific carjacking statute, it treats such offenses under the crime of robbery.

Joyriding

Joyriding occurs when someone takes another’s vehicle without their permission but also does not intend to permanently deprive the owner of their vehicle. In other words, they don’t have permission to borrow it, but they didn’t intend on keeping it. Joyriding is classified as an unauthorized use of a motor-propelled conveyance and is a Class 1 misdemeanor offense.

Keeping a Rental Car

It can be a criminal offense to maintain possession of a rental car after the time period agreed upon has expired. Again, while there is no specific law for this in North Carolina, the state will often charge this as larceny or joyriding. 

Legal Defenses to Auto Theft

While there are a variety of legal defenses to auto theft, here are some of the most common:

Consent

One defense to auto theft is consent. The individual accused may have had permission or believe that they have permission from the owner of the vehicle to use it. When this is the case, the individual is not guilty of larceny. Generally, when an individual raises this defense it’s because they had permission on one or more previous occasions and believed that it would be reasonable for that consent to continue. 

Mistake of Fact

Another defense is mistake of fact. This occurs when someone uses or borrows a stolen vehicle but is unaware that it was stolen. This individual cannot be found guilty of larceny of a motor vehicle. 

Permanent Deprivation

In order to commit larceny of a motor vehicle, the individual in question must intend to permanently deprive the owner of the vehicle of its use or possession. However, this individual may still be guilty of joyriding. 

Consequences

Motor vehicle theft can be considered a misdemeanor or a felony depending upon the facts and circumstances of each case. If someone is convicted of larceny, they may face jail or prison, probation, fines, and/or more. 

The Attorneys at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with Auto Theft

If you or a loved one has been charged with auto theft or a related crime, it’s imperative that you contact a North Carolina criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. You may have a legal defense. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you fight your charges and obtain the best possible outcome for you. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

cop cars at the scene of violent crime

Childhood Trauma May Serve as Mitigating Factor Concerning Violent Crimes

While all crimes are to be taken very seriously, violent crimes are considered much more serious than other “victimless” crimes, such as traffic offenses. As a result, those who are convicted of a violent crime often face lengthy jail sentences and hefty fines – not to mention a criminal record, which often impacts everything from where you can live to where you can work. This is why providing a defense against these accusations can be a good idea. Even if convicted, certain statements to the court may help to lessen the severity of your sentence. These are known as mitigating factors. 

One method that may prove very helpful is to ask the court for leniency through the presentation of childhood trauma, as there is a psychology often associated with violent crimes. 

The Origins of Much Violent Crime

Violent crimes usually don’t happen in a vacuum. Many people adopt violent behaviors in order to protect themselves from harm or simply put, to survive. When resources are scarce most people will go into survival mode. Individuals who have suffered childhood trauma or who have, themselves, been the victim of violent crime are likelier to commit violent offenses later on. 

Violent behaviors are often an effect of a subconscious need to protect oneself. Therefore, one of the better solutions for these individuals to heal and move beyond their issues is to seek counseling and probation – not incarceration. Community support can also make a big difference. 

Consider Your Background and Childhood

If you have been charged with a violent crime, it may prove extremely helpful to take a look at your background, including your childhood, to determine if there are factors that may help to mitigate the charges against you. This is not to say that you are denying responsibility, but that the punishment should take these factors into consideration. You may wish to request rehabilitation rather than incarceration. This is where an experienced attorney can prove very helpful. He or she can learn about your background and help to determine factors that may help your case. 

Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Violent Crime

It can be incredibly scary to be arrested, and even more frightening to learn that you are going to be prosecuted under the criminal justice system. Not only the outcome of the case, but the experience itself can have a major impact on your life. That is why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

Cop car with flashing lights

What to Know About Open Container Laws in North Carolina

Driving under the influence of alcohol has long been understood as illegal. But what many may not know is that in North Carolina it is also illegal for someone to transport an open container of any alcoholic beverage in the passenger area of the vehicle while the vehicle is parked or being driven on a public roadway. Under North Carolina law, an open container is one in which the seal is broken. The passenger area of a vehicle is any area in which someone sits and any area within the reach of a person who is seated in the vehicle. For example, the passenger area would not only include the front passenger seat, but also the glove compartment. 

This law also pertains to both drivers and passengers of the vehicle. It’s important to understand that there is no law against transporting an unopened (closed) container of alcohol. Put simply, you can’t bring your open bottle of wine home from your favorite BYOB restaurant, but you can bring home an unopened bottle of wine that you purchased from the liquor store. 

Any open containers must be kept in areas of the vehicle that are inaccessible, such as the trunk or a locked area. If the vehicle does not have a trunk, open containers are legally allowed to be transported in the area behind the back seats. 

It’s also important to understand the beverages to which this rule applies. Such alcohol beverages this rule pertains to include:

  • Fortified and unfortified wine;
  • Spirituous liquor (hard alcohols such as vodka and tequila);
  • Malt beverages; and
  • Mixed beverages.

Are There Any Exceptions to the Law?

It should be noted that there are, in fact, a couple of exceptions to North Carolina’s open container law. The exceptions include having alcohol:

  • In the living quarters of a motor home or house vehicle; or
  • In the passenger areas of taxis, limos, buses, and other vehicles-for-hire.

What Are the Consequences?

The penalties someone faces for an open container violation are dependent upon the specific facts of each case. Depending upon the circumstances, a violation could be considered a misdemeanor or an infraction. 

Infractions, which are non-criminal violations in which the offender cannot be arrested, occur when a driver or passenger is in possession of an open container (and the driver does not have alcohol in his or her system and is not consuming it). Infractions result in a maximum fine of $100 plus costs. 

An open container misdemeanor, on the other hand, is issued when a driver is consuming alcohol or has it in his or her system while also transporting an open container. Such an offense is considered a Class 3 misdemeanor, with a subsequent offense being considered Class 2. Those charged with Class 3 misdemeanors will face up to 20 days in jail, while those with a Class 2 misdemeanor may face up to 60 days. For many individuals with a Class 2 misdemeanor, they will receive a fine and probation if convicted. 

 If a driver is charged with a misdemeanor open container offense, they will also likely be subject to North Carolina’s implied consent laws and must submit to a breath or blood test. Those who refuse to take the test or who test with a BAC of .08% or higher will likely have their license revoked (6-month- and one-year-required revocation for second convictions and third or subsequent convictions respectively.)

Additionally, open container violations are considered to be moving violations in North Carolina and the state DMV will potentially assess points against the driver’s license. 

The Attorneys at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Crime

It can be incredibly scary to be arrested, and even more frightening to learn that you are going to be prosecuted under the criminal justice system. Not only the outcome of the case, but the experience itself can have a major impact on your life. That is why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

man handcuffed

Must Juvenile Sex Offenders Be Added to the Sex Offender Registry?

Regardless of the age of the alleged perpetrator, sex crimes are taken very seriously. However, it’s important to acknowledge that how North Carolina treats juveniles fares very differently than adults despite certain similarities. So, what does this mean when it comes to registering as a public sex offender? Must juveniles who commit the same crimes as adult sex offenders register as public sex offenders? Here’s what to know. 

When Must a Juvenile Register?

In North Carolina, if a juvenile is convicted of certain sex offenses, a judge can require them to register as a sex offender. However, this is only true for certain crimes. Juvenile offenders over the age of 11 are commonly ordered to register as a sex offender if they are found guilty of any of the following offenses:

  • First-degree statutory rape
  • Second-degree statutory rape
  • First-degree forcible rape
  • Second-degree forcible rape
  • First-degree forcible sexual offense
  • Second-degree forcible sexual offense
  • Attempted sexual offense or rape
  • First-degree statutory sexual offense

It’s important to discern that the fact that a juvenile has been convicted of a sexual offense is not enough by itself to require that they register as a sex offender. They must be ordered by a judge, who has the freedom to make that decision. In making this decision he or she must look at whether the juvenile is a threat to the community. Juvenile offenders who are convicted are required to register for the public sex offender registry with the sheriff’s office. 

If a juvenile is charged as an adult for one of the sex crimes that require sex offender registration, then the child is required to do the same things as an adult offender would do. 

Requirements for Registering as a Sex Offender

When a juvenile is required to register as a sex offender in North Carolina, the court must make them aware of this requirement, have them sign a form acknowledging that they are aware that they must register, and receive all required information. The court will then file that information with the sheriff’s office. There is a separate registry for children versus adult offenders. 

If a juvenile on the sex offender registry changes their address, they must notify the court of the new address. It’s also important to note that the information on the sex offender registry must be verified as true through the court. 

The Attorneys at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Crime

It can be incredibly scary to be arrested, and even more frightening to learn that you are going to be prosecuted under the criminal justice system. Not only the outcome of the case, but the experience itself can have a major impact on your life. That is why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

Driving While Intoxicated

Don’t Sleep in Your Vehicle When Intoxicated

When you’re out and you’ve had a few drinks, you likely know that you shouldn’t get behind the wheel of a car and drive. In an effort to be safe and protect yourself and others, you may make the decision to sleep in your car until you sober up. However, while this may be a safer option, it’s still not legal. 

You may be surprised to learn that you don’t actually need to be driving a vehicle in order to be charged with DWI (driving while intoxicated) in North Carolina. 

State DWI Laws 

In North Carolina, in order to be found guilty of drunk driving, an individual must be operating a vehicle. But what specifically does it mean to “operate” one? Under state law, an operator is “a person in actual physical control of a vehicle which is in motion or which has the engine running.” Even if the vehicle is parked, if the engine is running someone can be charged with DWI – even if they are asleep. For instance, if it’s wintertime and you decide to sleep in the back seat of your car but you turn the car on solely for the heat, you could still be charged with DWI. However, if you are asleep in the back seat of your car but you do not turn the engine on, you may have a solid defense against DWI since you can argue that you were not operating the vehicle. 

So What Should You Do Instead?

If you have been drinking it’s best not to sleep it off in your vehicle. Instead, try calling a friend or family member to come and pick you up. Alternatively, you can call a rideshare company, such as Uber or Lyft, to come and get you. Another possibility is to ask the host (if you are at someone’s house) if you can stay the night. If for whatever reason you have no choice but to sleep in your car, always do so in the back seat. But before you do, place the keys in the glove compartment, under the front seat, or in the trunk. 

The Attorneys at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with DWI

If you or a loved one has been charged with DWI, it can be extremely overwhelming – especially if you had no intention of driving. A conviction for DWI can have an immense impact on many aspects of your life. That is why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

Posted in DWI
criminal defense

How Do Parole and Probation Differ?

It is an extremely worrisome occurrence to be charged with a crime. While your first thought is likely how you can avoid a conviction, you may also be wondering what should happen if you are, in fact, found guilty. Punishments for the conviction of a crime include jail time, fines, and community service, as well as probation. However, people often confuse probation with parole. It’s important that you understand the major differences between the two.

Two Different Programs

Probation is a program that often acts as an alternative to going to jail when convicted of a crime. Parole on the other hand, while also a program, is for people who have been to prison but are released prior to the completion of their sentence. 

Both programs involve being supervised by officers. People in both programs must check in with their supervising officer on a regular ongoing basis as the program requires. Each program also requires that the participant follows specific rules. These may include staying away from any known felons, possessing firearms, holding a job, and/or staying off of drugs. Some participants may be regularly tested for drugs. 

Avoid New Legal Issues

While you should avoid getting involved with any new legal issues in general, it is especially important that you do so when you are on either probation or parole. In fact, if you get into any additional legal trouble, it could count as a violation of your program and you may end up with more serious consequences. For example, if you violate the rules of your parole by getting into other legal trouble, you could end up in jail to finish the remainder of your sentence. On the flip side, if you are able to make it through your program without violating the rules of your program, you will be released from the program in a timely manner.

The Attorneys at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Crime

There’s no doubt that being charged with and eventually prosecuted for a crime is very frightening. You may find yourself without any idea of where to turn and what to do. Not only the outcome of the case, but the experience itself can have a major negative impact on your life. No matter the criminal charges levied against you, a resulting conviction can forever change the trajectory of your life. For this reason, it’s in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced North Carolina criminal defense attorney who will fight to have your charges reduced or eliminated altogether. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

Man sitting guilty in front of attorney

What Are the Differences Between Robbery and Burglary in NC?

You may have heard people talk about the crimes of robbery and burglary as if they are the same thing. However, it’s important to note that they are not. The penalties for both of these crimes depend upon the specific facts of each case and upon the criminal history of the defendant(s). Punishments could range from probation to lengthy prison sentences. So what are the differences between robbery and burglary in North Carolina?

In North Carolina, robbery is the theft of something from another person through the threat of violence. The penalties for this crime vary greatly depending upon whether or not the defendant used a weapon and whether the alleged victim suffered any injuries. Since the sentence for this crime can so greatly vary, some people prefer to accept a plea bargain for larceny instead of risking a serious penalty should they proceed to trial. 

Burglary, on the other hand, is when someone enters a home, business, or other building with the intent to commit a felony. For instance, even walking through a door that is open into a garage that is open can be considered to be a burglary if it can be proven that the defendant intended to commit a felony when passing through the building. It doesn’t require that your intention was carried out or that crime was completed. Sentences for burglary also vary greatly depending on various factors such as the type of building that was entered, whether it was entered at night, and whether it was occupied at the time. Another lesser offense that you may be able to have your charges reduced to is breaking and entering. 

While most people think of burglaries that occur in homes and businesses, burglaries can, in fact, occur in a multitude of other places, such as:

  •  Factories 
  • Churches or places of worship
  • Barns
  • Garages
  • Condominiums
  • Apartments
  • Public buildings
  • Schools
  • Ships
  • Warehouses
  • Railroad cars
  • Horse stables
  • Houseboats
  • Outbuildings

It is important to note that places that are used only for recreational purposes are not considered structures. This may include things such as:

  • Motorhomes
  • Tents
  • Tent trailers
  • House trailers
  • Telephone booths

The Attorneys at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Crime

It can be incredibly scary to be arrested, and even more frightening to learn that you are going to be prosecuted under the criminal justice system. Not only the outcome of the case, but the experience itself can have a major impact on your life. That is why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

Drug Crimes

What to Know About North Carolina’s First Step Act

Drug issues are running rampant in today’s current landscape. But people would not be able to obtain drugs without the existence of drug trafficking. Drug trafficking includes either the transport or sale of controlled substances to others. Drug trafficking is a more serious offense than drug possession since it impacts many more lives. Therefore, the penalties associated with it are much more serious as well. 

While North Carolina usually requires its judges to comply with mandatory sentencing rules for drug trafficking, there is a new law that may change that depending upon the circumstances. The newly enacted First Step Act allows for a judge to depart from the rules in some cases. So, when exactly does the First Step Act apply? Here’s what to know.

The Circumstances of the Case

The circumstances of each case impact whether the First Step Act can apply to a drug trafficking case. The first requirement for the First Step Act to apply is that the accused must accept responsibility for his or her actions. Additionally, he or she must not have used a dangerous weapon or another type of violence when carrying out the alleged drug trafficking. 

The Criminal History of the Alleged Trafficker

The next thing taken into consideration is the criminal history of the alleged trafficker. The individual who is charged cannot have any previous felony convictions – otherwise, the First Step Act cannot apply. While this includes prior drug charges, it also includes any other felonies. If there is any evidence that the accused was previously involved in either using violence to commit a crime or engaging in the manufacture, transport, delivery, or sale of a controlled substance, the First Step Act cannot apply. 

The Amount of the Controlled Substances

The next factor in determining whether the First Step Act can apply is the amount of the controlled substances involved. The amount of the controlled substance in the accused’s possession must fall within the lowest category for trafficking that type of substance. 

If the court finds that the First Step Act can apply, the individual who is accused may be able to receive limits on their sentence should they be convicted.

The Attorneys at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Crime

It can be incredibly scary to be arrested, and even more frightening to learn that you are going to be prosecuted under the criminal justice system. Not only the outcome of the case, but the experience itself can have a major impact on your life. That is why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you to fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!