Defending Yourself Against Prescription Drug Fraud Charges in NC

By Joel Hancock
Founder

Modern medicine has made such an impact on the way that we live our lives. It helps millions of people each day to feel better. Unfortunately, though, many people use medications for the wrong reasons and commit prescription fraud in an attempt to gain access to more pills. 

Common Drugs Obtained Through Prescription Fraud

Common drugs often obtained through prescription fraud include:

  • Benzodiazepines
  • Stimulants
  • Pain relievers

Opioids are a type of pain reliever that is highly addictive. In recent years opioid addiction has become an epidemic of massive proportions. Since those who take opiates eventually adjust to them, they require a higher and higher dosage to get the same effect. 

Common Types of Prescription Fraud

Prescription fraud is not only committed by patients, but by medical professionals as well. There are a number of ways in which someone can commit prescription fraud. Such ways include:

  • Forging a prescription
  • Calling in a prescription while pretending to be a doctor
  • Doctor shopping (visiting multiple doctors to obtain more prescriptions)
  • Filing a false report that claiming medication theft so that you can obtain more medication
  • Prescribing medication without any real reason
  • Purchasing, obtaining, and/or sharing prescription medication with others

Penalties for Prescription Fraud in North Carolina

When someone is found guilty of committing prescription fraud in Texas, they must face the consequences. If the drug is considered Scheduled I, prescription fraud can be charged as a Class I felony. As such you can face three to 12 months in prison. 

When the controlled substance involved is considered a Schedule II, III, or IV drug, you can be charged with a Class 1 misdemeanor, though in rare situations can be charged as a Class I felony. If you are convicted, you can face the same between one and 120 days in jail. 

When the controlled substance involved is considered a Schedule V drug, you can be charged with a Class 2 misdemeanor. If you are convicted, you can face up to 60 days in jail and a fine of up to $1,000.

When the controlled substance involved is considered a Schedule VI drug, it can be charged as a Class 3 misdemeanor. If you are convicted, you could face up to 30 days in jail and a $200 fine.

The Attorneys at Hancock Law Firm, PLLC Help Those in North Carolina Who Have Been Charged with a Crime

A criminal conviction in North Carolina can have a very long-lasting impact on your life. Not only can it affect your ability to obtain or keep certain jobs, but also it can have a permanent impact on your reputation. Additionally, the insanity defense in North Carolina can be quite complex. That’s why it is in your best interest to consult with a knowledgeable and experienced criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. 

At Hancock Law Firm, PLLC, we fully understand what is at stake and will do everything that we can to help you fight these charges and obtain the best possible outcome for you. To learn more or to schedule a free consultation, contact us today!

About the Author
Joel Hancock is a native of Carteret County, NC. He devotes 100% of his practice to defending those accused of traffic infractions, DWI, misdemeanors, and felonies in Carteret County, NC.